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Deliberate Development

Professional Development for the Military Leader

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Teams

Honor the Supervisor-Subordinate Relationship

It is critical that leaders at all levels engage with the Airmen around us. Regular interaction allows us to connect with teammates on a human level, ensure they are well cared for and track their development. It affords us the opportunity to mentor our teams as we navigate the chaos that comes with managing a human workforce.

Open door policies, brown bag lunches, and daily drive-by visits make this a simple enough process. The challenge we face is that we bear an equal responsibility to respect and advocate for healthy supervisor-subordinate relationships. It can be tempting to solve the problem or give advice on how to meet that goal; after all, we’ve been there before and know just what to do! While this impulse is well intended (and will guarantee us an instant shot of self-satisfaction), we also cut a supervisor off at the knees and rob them of the chance to build trust and confidence with that Airman. And sadly, the interaction will likely teach that Airmen to seek counsel from outside sources in the future. Next time you find yourself in this situation, consider biting your tongue and passing those thoughts or resources on to the supervisor. Teach them to do what you can and give them the chance to shine in the eyes of that Airman.

Daily Deliberation: 13 June 2019

We are meant for great things. However, when the finish line of the race is designed to edify ourselves, we are missing the point. We have the gifts and talents that we do to further a cause or an ideal. We will all be pushing posies at one point, but the causes we champion will continue on. I already know you are a legend, no need to prove it to anyone else. Further someone or something and your work will live on forever.

Daily Deliberation: 21 April 2019

What does this quote from Alexander the Great mean to you? To me, it means we have to be strong as leaders. We can’t be afraid to stand up for our team and to our team. I recently watched as a supervisor chastised his subordinate and then flip-flopped when he got push-back. If he could not even stand firm with his troop, how in the world is he expected to stand firm when talking to someone higher in the food chain than himself. Being a lion means we have to protect the team and also ensure we are handling issues on the team too.

Daily Deliberation: 14 April 2019

Many of us look at being a leader like Maximus Decimus Meridius in the movie Gladiator. We lead the charge into battle and are revered for our courage and battlefield prowess. Because of our technical abilities, we are usually promoted to positions of leadership. However, if we get into the weeds too often, we are not focused on the bigger picture and not helping the whole team. We need to be involved in the daily tasks being performed, but it is our primary job to equip our team with the proper training and resources. Equipping others to fight the battle is much more valuable than your individual efforts.

Daily Deliberation: 6 April 2019

This is one of the biggest complaints I have ever heard about those of us with rank. “SNCOs look good because we work hard for them and then they forget all about us.” This kills me to think I may have given that impression and I work really hard to never do that. We are a team that needs everyone on it to be successful. Those doing the work make the mission happen. Those of us with rank are there because we have more experience and the ability to see the obstacles coming up and move them before the team gets there. People are not on our teams to service our desires…we serve each other to lift each other.

Daily Deliberation: 5 March 2019

As I have gotten older my mom’s “you can be whatever you want to be” advice has taken a different meaning. I am pretty confident I will never become a brain surgeon or beat Lebron James one-on-one. There are certain jobs in the military that I would not do well in either, but I am ok with that. We don’t have to be the wing commander to have a voice or be a leader. I see new Airmen and Lieutenants leading every single day. In fact, it is these “boots-on-the-ground” leaders who are the true leaders pushing the mission with a can-do attitude. I do not need rank or authority to be a leader; I need to have strong character traits. I can’t always control ‘what’ my job will be, but I can control who I am.

Daily Deliberation: 23 February 2019

I have noticed this throughout my career. Once I learn my job, I grow to complacency as I go through the motions of my day. I build controls into my day to prevent me from getting too comfortable. To do this, we could take on a challenge we know will push us harder. We can ask someone on the team to hold us accountable by looking over our work. Take a look at your daily routine and see if there are ways to stretch your abilities. If you don’t seek ways to progress, those on your team won’t either.

Daily Deliberation: 31 July 2018

This is one of the biggest complaints I have ever heard about those of us with rank. “SNCOs look good because we work hard for them and then they forget all about us.” This kills me to think I may have given that impression and I work really hard to never do that. We are a team that needs everyone on it to be successful. Those doing the work make the mission happen. Those of us with rank are there because we have more experience and the ability to see the obstacles coming up and move them before the team gets there. People are not on our teams to service our desires…we serve each other to lift each other.

Win the Leadership Long Game

Everyone know that guys or girl; they are the one who everyone looks to for guidance; they are reassuring, trusted, confident and display a sense of power over their surroundings. In short: people want to be like them. In a business setting these behaviors instill pride in the followers driving development of enduring leadership qualities. In this entry I will examine Idealized Influence and Inspirational Motivation, as well as ways you can use them in your work center to develop leaders.

In my eyes, Idealized Influence and Inspirational Motivation feed into one another, and there is a lot of cross over of traits from one side to another.  Idealized Influence and Inspirational Motivation are the building blocks of your leadership toolbox; a solid foundation that builds lasting competencies for your followers.  One these attributes is charisma. I think a lot of people can identify with this trait, as they are familiar with it from books and movies, whether it be in Operation Red Wings, Bengazi, Takur Ghar, or even on Wall Street, people know what charisma is, and they respond to it.   Charisma drives Idealized Influence/Inspirational Motivation, but you don’t have to be the person described in the introduction to benefit from Idealized Influence/Inspirational Motivation.

For example, lets say you have two leaders. Leader One on the surface is lights out: finishes first in every run, can bench press a car, seems like a great leader, has a Phd AND his troops win awards, and he and his flight are great at what they do, but he doesn’t actively develop his people—he just shows up and benefits from what was already there. Outwardly this person seems like a star.

Then there is Leader Two: this person pushes themselves each day, goes back for their airmen on runs, benches a smaller car, give direct guidance/benchmarks/goals to their Airmen on what they need to do to win awards/excel in their given profession. In short Leader Two drives the development of their Airmen—shows them a vision; plants a seed, provides motivation.

Who has a bigger impact? Who is ready for more responsibility? When comparing these two leaders I think that Leader One will not win the long game, because he/she will get to a point where he/she needs to develop people and he will not have laid a foundation for continued progression (i.e. did not use Idealized Influence/Inspirational Motivation), where as Leader Two did lay the groundwork for the future of his flight/squadron. Leader Two motivated his people for the better, he developed a vision and plan on how to accomplish it, and this benefited the group. That’s what leaders do. You are in a position of authority because you have proven that you put the rest of the guys/girls well-being in front of yours. You eat last; first in line for a bad deal, last in line for a good deal. In my opinion, that’s why Leader Two will win the long game.

The following is how I work leadership development into my day, and I think this method can be adapted to any situation; in any industry:

Every morning I ask myself how can I help the people assigned to me? How can I make them better at their given tasks, how can I harness their innate gifts to increase our lethality? In other words how can I deliberately develop my people? After all, this is my task. Some days this means I work on a skill I need to develop, so I can pass it on, and some days this means that I have “Sgt time” for hands on remedial training so I can solidify my team’s understanding/application of a subject. Either way, my team is getting stronger and heading in the right direction.

I hope you have found value in this entry, and more importantly it has made you think of ways you can develop your followers.

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