Search

Deliberate Development

Professional Development for the Military Leader

Category

Teams

Transformational Leadership Development: Idealized Influence

Today I would like to touch on one of the anchor points of a critical aspect of your development as a leader: Transformational Leadership (TL).

My main motivations for writing this section are two core beliefs:

  1. It is my belief that the traits that make successful leaders can be developed by focusing on the individual, while adhering to four core tenants of TL, and
  2. Leaders must lead, not manage (you lead people and manage programs)!

TL is often praised as the key to the total development of your followers; however we are not always shown “how” to lead in our developmental PME courses, and in my experience, much of the leadership development is left up to chance by letting individuals who have certain personality traits lead lines of effort—whether they are ready or not. But how do you, or your troops, develop these traits? Throughout this series I will explore the topic of TL and how you can apply it to your situation.

The first aspect of TL I would like to examine is Idealized Influence.Idealized Influence is your ability to act in ways that make you the role model— make your troops want to be like you! You are the consummate professional. You are charismatic, on-time, prepared, calm, positive, and stay true to your ethical and moral standards in the actions you take. You are honest, reliable and actively build trust with your followers. In other words you set the example; you walk the walk—but most importantly you have a vision.

You may not have all of these skills in your leadership toolbox now, but since we have identified what traits you need to practice you can start to include them in you daily interactions with your co-workers. For example, if one of your followers is having problems with a specific task you could take action by:

  1. Showing them how to do the task,
  2. Explain its importance to the overall objectives of the organization, and
  3. Highlight how important becoming proficient at this task is, and how they will be able to build a better tomorrow for their organization.

No matter how big your area of influence is, by practicingIdealized Influence, you can make an impact with your actions and foster a positive developmental environment for you troops and yourself.

In my next entry I will explore Inspirational Motivation, and how you can use it to broaden your influence and lead your teams.

Advertisements

Why Is Everyone Else Lazy?

One of the biggest struggles I see new leaders having is the difficulty getting others to care as much as they do. It all comes down to pride in ownership.

I remember taking martial arts as a kid and walking into the training center for months and completely ignored the chairs in the waiting area. Then one day, my instructor placed me in charge of ensuring the waiting room was clean before and after each class. One of the tasks…straightening up the chairs. I could not fathom how people could simply walk past crooked chairs or not care about how they looked when they stood up. I was tempted to make a sign or even “educate” others.

The problem wasn’t the people or their habits, it was me. I had never even given the chairs a second glance until I was in charge of them. When we take over a program or some area, we have pride in ownership. We want things to be just right because our name is attached to it. Or maybe just because we notice the problem now that we own it. Whatever the case, we have to respect the fact that others probably don’t know about the problem.

What can you do? First, think about if the problem is something others need to know about. For example, a sign in the waiting room educating parents on chair alignment would not be something of value. However, if it is something that you learned about that would benefit others, it is something that needs shared.

Next, educate. Maybe people are not taking pride in what they do on a daily basis. Show them the impact of their work. I read before that the coach of the U.S. Men’s Olympic basketball team took them to Arlington Cemetery to get a feel of what it means to serve their nation. They were able to represent our flag in sport because these heroes gave it all for them in combat. Maybe it doesn’t have to be that drastic, but find a way to show them how they fit into the bigger picture.

Lastly, create an environment for them to grow. General Stanley McChrystal talks about being a gardener. The gardener does not make the seed grow. No matter what they do, they can not make the seed grow. They can only cultivate the proper environment for it to grow.

Don’t blame others for not caring about the same things you do, give them ownership of the problem or educate them on the importance of it.

Daily Deliberation: 20 January 2018

Rule one of flightline management was to not treat the Crew Chiefs poorly. This group is used to working in crappy conditions, missing lunches, and never getting ahead and basically have nothing to lose. So when new managers would come aboard and try to overwork them even more, they would get their revenge. Something that typically took 4 hours could easily take 16. Crew Chiefs are willing to use their experience and gifts to get things done by the book while overlapping tasks. It takes years to cultivate this; however, when someone treats them bad, they get “nervous” and do each task separately. This is a minor example of what poorly treated people can do. Take the time to seek your team’s feedback and listen. They don’t want you to fail.

How Should a Great SSgt’s EPR Read?

Photo: Courtesy of Fine Art America

Tis the season. The holidays are upon us as are the SSgt SCOD EPRs. One of the most frequent questions we are asked during this time frame is how can push our SSgts higher on the list for Forced Distribution? I think the better question is how should a SSgt EPR read?

To be clear: I am not talking solely about making people look good on paper. I am suggesting that we need to be developing our members throughout the year and capture their efforts on paper. I am not a fan of “inflating” our teammates for the sake of EPRs.

The greatest piece of Air Force literature still remains to be the 36-2618 (Enlisted Force Structure). This book has been about 90% accurate for every new rank I have made and has provided me guidance on what to strive for when my supervisors did not. In there, it discusses what a SSgt “should” look like. They “are primarily highly skilled technicians with supervisory and training responsibilities.” This quickly read statement holds the keys to being a good SSgt.

Highly skilled technician: know your job. SSgts should be able to do their job with no one looking over their shoulders. No one should be coming behind them to fix their mistakes. They are trusted to care for their piece of the pie.

Example: SSgt Lawrence troubleshot and fixed landing gear issue… He generated 100 missions throughout the year… etc. are all examples of this. How is the SSgt doing their job well? Bullets showing job skills are often “me” focused.

Supervisory responsibilities: Typically, this is where you are a first-time supervisor with some Airmen to shepherd. You have CDCs to track, EPRs to write, feedbacks to perform, dorm inspection fails, and all of the other supervisory challenges that come with this new role.

Example: SSgt Lawrence challenged Airman X to get an 85% on CDCs… He led a volunteer clean-up event… These bullets usually show one-on-one leadership impacts or small team efforts.

Training responsibilities: Teach new Airmen and newly assigned teammates how to do their jobs. Also, teaching your subordinates how to be in the service.

Example: SSgt Lawrence trained 5 Airmen on 200 core tasks… He became the unit CPR instructor… Again, these are one-on-one or small team efforts.

A good SSgt EPR shows a mixture of all three of these things.

Now to take this up a notch to develop great SSgts, you need to show how they are ready for the next stripe. TSgts are the “organization’s technical experts.” This is a detail often overlooked as most SSgts are so skilled, they assume they are the technical experts already. I see this all the time as they say, “I am an expert, I can do that task in half the time of my peers.” That is the definition of highly skilled.

Technical expertise is when you know your job so well that you are solving problems. “Noticed trend of #4 main tires being changed out-of-cycle. Discovered factory bolt installed backwards on all block 11 aircraft.” A different way to say this is that highly skilled technicians are hands-on experts and technical experts are able to connect the dots of a bigger picture based on their skills.

Work to develop your SSgts to 1) be very good at being “highly skilled technicians with supervisory and training responsibilities.” as discussed above. and then 2) teach them to take a step back to see the whole picture and help them connect the dots to solve problems not to simply fix discrepancies.

As you do this, they will grow in their supervisor and trainer roles organically. You can’t solve problems without leading a team of leaders or training people on a mass scale to implement a smarter solution.

Daily Deliberation: 19 November 2017

We are meant for great things. However, when the finish line of the race is designed to edify ourselves, we are missing the point. We have the gifts and talents that we do to further a cause or an ideal. We will all be pushing posies at one point, but the causes we champion will continue on. I already know you are a legend, no need to prove it to anyone else. Further someone or something and your work will live on forever.

Open Door Policies are Useless

Photo from DanNielson.com

Every single time I heard a leader tell me over the years that they have an open door policy I have wanted to laugh. I envisioned myself walking past the other three links in my chain of command and right into his or her office to express my thoughts. In my mind, I never even made it to the door. I have learned others feel the same way too.

I completely and wholeheartedly believe the leader who says the door is open and I genuinely believe they would want to help me. Many are concerned about the fallout from walking through that door and voicing a concern that hasn’t been routed through the chain with a staff summary sheet firmly affixed. This is something we need to address as leaders. I want those on my team to be able to go direct to the person who could best solve the problem for them not to be redirected.

Recently, I had an issue with my cell phone bill and called the customer service line. I knew I needed to speak to a supervisor in billing to get this charge removed from past experiences; however, I had to talk to a customer service agent who then transferred me to tech support and then to billing. From there I had to get a little rude to even get to the supervisor I wanted from the beginning who was able to fix my issue. Over 30 minutes wasted. Yet we do the same thing to our team members and wonder why they are not taking initiative to fix problems. We are simply wearing them down before they even make it to the appropriate level who can assist.

I am now that tool standing in front of my team spouting the cliche about how my door is open. However, I employ a few other methods to connect and receive feedback other than “hope” someone will have the courage to walk through my door.

1. ) Culture of trust: No matter what the issue is that is highlighted to me, I don’t punish the other links in the chain that were skipped or who couldn’t solve the problem. Look at what the issue is, not who to blame for it. Is there a way to empower or train others to solve this at their level?

2.) Anonymous feedback: I created a survey on Survey Monkey that provides an anonymous way to pass me concerns. My team can do this from home, their phone, their desk or where ever they choose and I will never know who was saying it unless they tell me. This is better than a comment box, because people have the fear they will be seen dropping the message. I have received some amazing feedback in there that has pointed me to some simple fixes which have paid dividends.

3.) Walk through your own open door: Get out of your office and go to where the work is being done in your unit. You will get to see firsthand what problems the team is facing and what struggles they have. I have been able to get ahead of so many major issues this way and it lets my team know I care. In fact, these are typically the people who end up taking advantage of my open door policy. Go figure.

Daily Deliberation: 5 September 2017

What does this quote from Alexander the Great mean to you? To me, it means we have to be strong as leaders. We can’t be afraid to stand up for our team and to our team. I recently watched as a supervisor chastised his subordinate and then flip-flopped when he got push-back. If he could not even stand firm with his troop, how in the world is he expected to stand firm when talking to someone higher in the food chain than himself. Being a lion means we have to protect the team and also ensure we are handling issues on the team too.

Daily Deliberation: 26 August 2017

Many of us look at being a leader like Maximus Decimus Meridius in the movie Gladiator. We lead the charge into battle and are revered for our courage and battlefield prowess. Because of our technical abilities, we are usually promoted to positions of leadership. However, if we get into the weeds too often, we are not focused on the bigger picture and not helping the whole team. We need to be involved in the daily tasks being performed, but it is our primary job to equip our team with the proper training and resources. Equipping others to fight the battle is much more valuable than your individual efforts.

Daily Deliberation: 16 August 2017

This is one of the biggest complaints I have ever heard about those of us with rank. “SNCOs look good because we work hard for them and then they forget all about us.” This kills me to think I may have given that impression and I work really hard to never do that. We are a team that needs everyone on it to be successful. Those doing the work make the mission happen. Those of us with rank are there because we have more experience and the ability to see the obstacles coming up and move them before the team gets there. People are not on our teams to service our desires…we serve each other to lift each other.

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑